Free Paperback Giveaway:  The Munich Girl by Phyllis Edgerly Ring

Free Paperback Giveaway: The Munich Girl by Phyllis Edgerly Ring

Free Paperback Giveaway:

The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War

by Phyllis Edgerly Ring

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Genre:

Historical Fiction, Romance

 

Blurb:

Anna Dahlberg grew up eating dinner under her father’s war-trophy portrait of Eva Braun. Fifty years after the war, she discovers what he never did—that her mother and Hitler’s mistress were friends. Plunged into the world of “ordinary” Munich girl who was her mother’s confidante — and a tyrant’s lover — she finds her every belief about right and wrong challenged. The long-buried secrets she uncovers will reveal the enduring power of friendship and the legacies of love that always outlast war.

Message from the author:

The past may not be done with us. What secrets is a portrait of Hitler’s mistress hiding? Enter for a chance to win WWII historical fiction, The Munich Girl.

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Book Review – A NECESSARY END by Diana Rubino

Book Review – A NECESSARY END by Diana Rubino

Book Review –

A NECESSARY END, The Act of a Desperate Rebel

by Diana Rubino

Average rating (all reviews) :

 

 

Rodney Strong
Fiction Author
 

 


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An Entertaining, if Slightly too Long, Book.  Would Look for Other Work by Ms. Rubino

“A Necessary End” re-imagines the events leading up to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth, told from the assassins point of view.  Throw in some supernatural elements and great attention to detail of living during those times and you get an entertaining, if slightly too long, book.

The author has obviously done her homework when it comes to creating an authentic world.  The detail is superb and the readers get a  clear sense of the conflict between the Confederate and Union sides of the civil war.  John Wilkes Booth is both a compassionate, and ruthless man who is driven to take action against an unjust president who breaks a promise to spare the life of a friend.  Over the course of the book he forms conspiracies, even while there are those that conspire against him.  At the same time he is haunted by a spirit, and this increasingly directs his actions.

This is a long book, and at times I felt frustrated at all the sub plots and, how all the female characters swooned over Booth.  It became a little repetitive, especially as the book progressed.  It felt like twenty pages could have been knocked off the total and we still would have had the essential story and characters.

It’s these little frustrations that stopped me from getting completely immersed in the book, and therefore giving it a 5 star rating.

Having said that, I was overall entertained by the book, and would look for other work by the same author.


The Reviewer is the Author of “Troy’s Possibilities” and “Murder in Paint”

 
Book Review – Oney, My Escape From Slavery by Diana Rubino and Piper Huguley

Book Review – Oney, My Escape From Slavery by Diana Rubino and Piper Huguley

Book Review – Oney, My Escape From Slavery

by Diana Rubino and Piper Huguley

Average rating (all reviews) :

 

1 Bloggers Review

Julia Wilson
Christian Bookaholic

 


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All Man Are Frec

Oney: My Escape From Slavery by Diana Rubino and Piper Huguley is an epic historical novel that blends fact and fiction into a marvellous tale.

At its heart is the question of slavery. It is appalling to the modern reader that this vile trade ever existed. Slaves were not seen as people but commodities. Some were treated well, others not but a palace is as much of a prison as a shack if you are not free.

Oney was a forward thinking young woman who wanted not only her freedom. “I’ve had enough of bein’ property. I wanna own my own body.” She wanted an education too. She was a very brave young woman. The novel surrounds the plight of women. Even those who thought they were free, were actually subject to the will of their husbands.

There is a tentative bond between Oney and her mistress. She was treated kindly but still seen as a possession to be given away on a whim.
Religion is mentioned. There are some who want religion and the state separate, others who want them tied together. The African Free Church plays a part in Oney’s life. She also observes her mistress “prayed whenever she wanted a favor from God, but I never heard her thank Him afterward.”

The novel is a comprehensive account of life in the 1790’s. The reader hears about the War Of Independence – ironically not all men were free – and the French Revolution. The reader is party to parlour gossip.

Oney is brave, gutsy and likable. The reader cheers her on, urging her towards freedom. I liked her.
A powerful emotional read surrounding an abhorrent practice.

To all those brave men, women and children. “Slavery took our bodies but they can’t take our souls.”

I received this book for free from the Book Gobbler. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own.


Originaly Posted on the Christian Bookaholic

 

 
Free eBook Giveaway : Oney, My Escape From Slavery by Diana Rubino, Piper Huguley

Free eBook Giveaway : Oney, My Escape From Slavery by Diana Rubino, Piper Huguley

by gobbler 1 Comment

Free eBook Giveaway : Oney, My Escape From Slavery

by Diana Rubino and Piper Huguley

Giving away:

  • 20 eBook(s) for reviews (2 given, 18 remaining)
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– ends 30th Apr 2018

Genre:

YA

Blurb:

Oney Judge is Martha Washington’s ‘personal servant’ – and soon-to-be confidante. Oney is a ‘quadroon’ – three parts white and one part black. So, unlike the white people who so recently gained their independence from the Mother Country, Oney is not free. She is Lady Washington’s inherited property, though the word ‘slave’ is never spoken. Oney works in “the big house” at Mount Vernon, sewing dresses and serving tea. Lady Washington treats her as well as her own grandchildren. But though she is often mistaken as a Washington relative by visitors, Oney remains in bondage.

In the spring of 1796, Lady Washington tells Oney that she will make her granddaughter Eliza a nice wedding gift. Oney soon discovers this does not mean sewing a negligee or a quilt for a gift. No, it means that she will be the gift.

This is the day that Oney decides to escape – to put her forced bondage behind her and make her bid for freedom. On May 21, 1796, Oney walks straight past the Washingtons and out the front door. Although they make several attempts to capture her, she lives the rest of her life in freedom.

Message from the author:

I learned about Oney when researching Martha Washington. Her courage and determination will inspire teens and young adults.

 

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No Evil (DCI Jack Callum #1)  by Maynard Sims 

No Evil (DCI Jack Callum #1)  by Maynard Sims 

by gobbler 0 Comments

No Evil (DCI Jack Callum #1)

by Maynard Sims

CI Jack Callum investigates the murder of 14 year old Frances Anderton found with her eyes and lips sewn shut and her ears filled with candle wax. A letter is left showing a drawing of the three monkeys (hear no evil, see no evil, say no evil), and the murders continue, all victims are young and innocent but no link between them can otherwise be found. In short, the police hasn’t got a single lead.
It’s 1958, methods of investigation as well as people’s views and conduct are quite old fashioned, and Jack is an old fashion guy, but with a liberal mind.

The scenery and imagery are appealing, it’s an old fashioned town, back in old fashioned England. It’s fun. The characters are believable and likable, even though they sometimes engage in very flat conversations. The Plot of the thriller is a bit lacking: sure you want to find out who has done it and once the perpetrator is discovered you are invested in it as much as Jack (i.e. I really wanted to see the bastard pay). However, in general the plot is also kind of “flat”, the motive is far-fetched and even the way the police gained a lead that brings them closed to the conclusion, is by a mere chance, you would expect something a bit smarter there as well.
It’s not that I didn’t enjoy the book, I did, it’s a light read in general and is well written, it’s just that the plot and the conclusion did not convince me, and then, at the end of the day, I rather do something else with my time than reading about dead mutilated teenagers… I found the link to Cullum’s family (no spoilers don’t worry) a ploy to get us further emotionally invested in the fa-fetched script, and wasn’t impressed.
In conclusion – it’s an okay read. Literary wise very accomplished, story-wise, could have been much better in my humble opinion.

 
A Twist in Time (Kendra Donovan, #2)  by Julie McElwain 

A Twist in Time (Kendra Donovan, #2)  by Julie McElwain 

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A Twist in Time (Kendra Donovan, #2) 

by Julie McElwain

Let me first start by saying that it’s been long over-due for me to read an Historical Fiction Novel. The last time, was about three years ago, finishing an excellent fictional series of novels about Churchill, written by the uncanny Michael Dobbs.
I was a bit worried about Julie McElwain’s “A Twist in Time” which I was approved to review by Netgalley – time travel? Georgian England? can these mix?
Well they certainly do!
Kendra (a very untypical name to 19th Century England, to emphasize her alien-ness) Donovon is stuck in the past. She is a capable FBI agent, and a very much free woman of the 21st Century. So, when her benefactor and protector (the Duke of Aldridge) needs her help proving his nephew Alec is innocent from murder allegations of the promiscuous Lady Dover – she immediately accepts the challenge.
It is fortunate that the Duke is a is an all-powerful figure in the classes society of PRE-Victorian England, but it is also an inconvenience to Kendra, who finds herself bound by Victorian gowns, the need for a chaperon outdoors, and the underestimation of people. She is resentful to a society that thinks less of women, especially those who do not find a good husband, and do more than to raise children and stay at home… the novel takes place in filthy 19th Century London, but is Kendra up for the challenge?
I found the book a fresh breath of air. There aren’t too many temporal mambo-jambo, and the differences between our society to Georgian England’s sticks out through Kendra inaptness to the strict rules enforced on the women of the era.
in a Poirot fashion, she will slowly cross off suspects from her blackboard, while employing modern day form of investigation, on an almost lawless society. She is aided by bow street runner Sam Kelly, who’s authority is weak at best, and is torn between her attraction to Alec, to the need of getting back home.
I found the novel is not over-sophisticated, it is a fun murder-she-wrote, that tics all the boxes for me. I will most definitely read the first book at some point (which says it all), Thumbs up!

(not to be confused with “Cinderella A Twist in Time” the 3rd sequel to Cinderella who left me and my little girl traumatised…!)

Goodread page for A Twist in Time (Kendra Donovan, #2) 
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Birdcage Walk by Helen Dunmore

Birdcage Walk by Helen Dunmore

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Birdcage Walk

by Helen Dunmore

I have never read Helen Dunmore books prior to Birdcage Walk and I wanted to thank Netgalley and the publisher on the opportunity to review this amazing masterpiece.

The novel starts with a discovery of a long-lost headstone for Julia Elizabeth Fawkes. Research had resulted with few if any details, save that Julia was an author read by many, and the wife of Augustus Gleeson, a noticeable pamphlet writer of the late 18th century, a time when the French revolution was in its height and the reports of the bloody streets of Paris inflamed the anti-Monarchy British intellectuals such as himself.

When it was apparent that none of Julia’s Writings have survived, Dunmore took it upon herself to revive the old pioneer English woman writer, maybe seeing much of herself in her imaginary character. The story takes place in late 18th century Bristol, when amidst the speculation about war with France, the real-estate market has collapsed – sending the economy, the entrepreneurs and many workers to chaotic desperation.
The story (in Brief) is cleverly told by Lizzie Fawkes, now Mrs Tredevant, Julia’s sole daughter. Having brought up in a liberal house, encouraged to act and think for herself, to be opinionated and never timid, Julia has broken from that suffocating shelter that her family provided to marry a speculate called John Diner, a widower who has made a small fortune by building houses and has now undertook a grandiose project of building the houses overlooking the Bristol Avon Gorge.
As Lizzie discovers that not everything is as perfect as she had convinced herself, we learn about her husband’s jealous character, his endeavours which are slowly but surely going bust, and Lizzy’s warm relationship with her mother and Hannah (their servant and close friend from when she was an infant). The subplot is that of the French revolution, as perceived by random reports that make it in, whether by post or by newspapers, and how differently they are perceived by John Diner and by Augustus and his milieu.

This is an historical fiction, but branding it as such does it little justice. Dunmore has managed to bring life into characters that existed (or some have) in real life, with such intensity that makes you forget yourself, all set into motion from a small script on a headstone!
The shadow of Dunmore’s disease must have entwined this novel in grimness that is leaping out of the pages – but give this novel the true colour of life in England and Europe in the 18-1900s. It is a masterpiece, and I dare say – Dunmore will be missed.